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South Waterfront Greenway Nearing Completion

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Relatively fresh off of working in construction management, one of my first big design assignments was the civil engineering work for the South Waterfront Greenway Central District – a combination park and active transportation corridor through Portland’s South Waterfront area. Our team spent the better part of 2007 through 2009 designing a gentler, more natural riverbank and stormwater infrastructure to support the Greenway.

Then, at the end of 2009, with the design process nearly complete, my family and I decided to move to Haiti to work on water and sanitation projects. This decision led to an incredibly unique adventure in engineering, world view and community.

After a life defining two year journey we returned home and I was fortunate enough to be re offered my old job at KPFF. It was the same position, the same desk and – surprisingly – some of the same projects. During one of my first days back in the office I was greeted by a smiling PM who warmly shook my hand saying, “It’s so great to have you back. You can help us finish South Waterfront!”

Indeed, I had assumed that the 90% complete plan set that I had left two years previous had in the those years become an actual park. I imagined bikers happily zipping along the river. I imagined families picnicking. I even imagined juvenile salmon resting on their journey up the Willamette. None of these existed. What did exist was a much different project – the result of two years of agency reviews and an economy that had forgotten the bold development of 2006.

So with that as prologue, I am excited to report that this past week I participated in the final walk through for the actual, constructed South Waterfront Greenway! The project is a stunning addition to Portland’s collection of waterfront trails and parks. The following is a highlight of some of the primary functions and features of the newly constructed park.

Pathways and Parklets

South Waterfront Greenway
Facing north up the Greenway. Note the lawn terraces on the slope and the separated pathways.

As originally envisioned, the Central District project would set the vision for a greenway trail that would run throughout the South Waterfront area. The completed corridor would include: separated bike and pedestrian paths for increased modal safety; parklets and overlooks where people could stop and enjoy the riverfront setting; and a notable focus on environmental stewardship and habitat restoration.

South Waterfront Bike Symbol
Brass bicycle (above) and pedestrian (below) symbols were cast into the trail at nodes along the corridor to direct traffic.

South Waterfront Greenway Ped Symbol

South Waterfront Greenway Trails
A view south from the top slope of the project. Note that though the geese began their journey on the asphalt bike path (above), they were able to correctly interpret the pathway symbols and soon moved to the concrete pedestrian path (below).

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Riverbanks and Low Water Habitat

As mentioned, the vision for the Greenway included an intentional focus on habitat restoration. The riverbank within the project – once stabilized by concrete rubble and demolition debris – has been cleaned up and flattened to create low water habitat for migratory fish.

South Waterfront Greenway Low Water Habitat
A view of the “cove” created to provide low water habitat. Much of my own work on the project is now underwater here. Note that the flatter banks have already begun recruiting beneficial woody debris.

South Waterfront Greenway Woody Debris

River Overlooks

The newly restored riverbank can be viewed from several overlooks. The overlooks vary in size and style and add to the sense that the Greenway is a destination and not just a transportation corridor.

South Waterfront Greenway Small Overlook
A small overlook where pedestrians can stop and admire the Willamette.
South Waterfront Greenway Large Overlook
A larger overlook near a node between the trails.

Stormwater Management

Runoff from the trails and adjacent features is treated and managed through a gravel swale that runs between the bike and pedestrian paths. Flow in these swales ultimately collects in one of several catch basins, which discharge to “level spreaders” that redistribute the flow along the riverbank.

South Waterfront Greenway Swale
A catch basin in the central water quality swale. Note the ponded water surrounding the grate. By forcing the water to pond, sediment is allowed to settle out of the runoff before it crosses to the river.
South Waterfront Greenway Level Spreader
Stormwater from the swale is piped to one of several level spreaders, where it fills the gravel trench shown and redistributes along the riverbank.

Site Furnishings and Artwork

Like the neighborhood that it supports, the Greenway has an obvious upscale character. The site is dotted with multiple, unique styles of benches and there is a riverbank stabilization themed art piece that was specifically commissioned for the site.

South Waterfront Greenway Benches
Multiple bench types provide ample opportunity to sit and enjoy a close up view of the Willamette River.
South Waterfront Greenway Concrete Bench
The use of wood decking is a common and unique theme throughout the project.
South Waterfront Greenway Artwork
Artist Buster Simpson designed this riverbank stabilization themed art piece specifically for the project. Root wads – which are often used to create bank roughness – are supported by jack type objects that were inspired by a barbed structure that has been historically used in coastal bank applications.

As you can see, the only thing missing from these pictures are the walkers, bikers and park enthusiasts who will undoubtedly discover this great new place once construction and the winter weather pass.

If you enjoyed this article, you may also be interested in the following past posts. Thanks for reading!

Detailing Vegetated Riverbanks

The Engineer and the Fisherman

LID at Metro’s Gleason Boat Ramp